The Ship of Fools

The Ship of Fools

Image courtesy of Richard Rapparport – Wiki commons

The ship of fools is an allegory that has long been a fixture in Western literature and art. The allegory depicts a vessel populated by human inhabitants who are deranged, frivolous, or oblivious, passengers aboard a ship without a pilot, and seemingly ignorant of their own direction. This concept makes up the framework of the 15th century book Ship of Fools (1494) by Sebastian Brant, which served as the inspiration for Bosch’s famous painting, Ship of Fools: a ship–an entire fleet at first–sets off from Basel to the paradise of fools. In literary and artistic compositions of the 15th and 16th centuries, the cultural motif of the ship of fools also served to parody the ‘ark of salvation’ (as the Catholic Church was styled).
Michel Foucault, who wrote Madness and Civilization, saw in the ship of fools a symbol of the consciousness of sin and evil alive in the medieval mindset and imaginative landscapes of the Renaissance. According to Jose Barchilon’s intro to Madness and Civilization,

“Renaissance men developed a delightful, yet horrible way of dealing with their mad denizens: they were put on a ship and entrusted to mariners because folly, water, and sea, as everyone then “knew,” had an affinity for each other. Thus, “Ship of Fools” crisscrossed the sea and canals of Europe with their comic and pathetic cargo of souls. Some of them found pleasure and even a cure in the changing surroundings, in the isolation of being cast off, while others withdrew further, became worse, or died alone and away from their families. The cities and villages which had thus rid themselves of their crazed and crazy, could now take pleasure in watching the exciting sideshow when a ship full of foreign lunatics would dock at their harbors.”
[wikipedia]
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~ by meanderingsofthemuse on March 31, 2011.

2 Responses to “The Ship of Fools”

  1. Welcome to the blogsphere!
    Kisses!
    K.

  2. I have something I have wanted to say ever since I read this post a few days ago, in response to the line:

    “they were put on a ship and entrusted to mariners because folly, water, and sea, as everyone then “knew,” had an affinity for each other.”

    about water and the feminine and the views of the time, but I can't seem to put it into worlds.

    FFF,
    ~Muninn's Kiss

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